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Apple iPhone 6 vs 6 Plus: Unboxing & Comparison

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iPhone 6 issues: Apple to change controller chip

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Users of Apple’s flagship handsets, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, are reporting performance and functionality defects. The issues are highly found in the 64GB and 128GB variants of both the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus handsets.

According to industry sources, Business Korea reported that Apple has decided to stop using triple level cell NAND (TLC NAND) as the chips are reportedly causing functionality issues with 64GB and 128GB variants of both, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. The problem has been cited with the controller IC of the TLC NAND chip.

Though TLC can store higher capacity (3 bits per cell) of data as compared to SLC (1 bit per cell) and MLC (1.5 bits per cell) chips, TLC is slower than the latter two, especially in reading and writing data.

The report stated that Apple is planning to switch to MLC chips in the 64GB and 128GB smartphones.

The present handsets, which have TLC NAND chips already shipped are in big question at present. Apple is planning to include a patch in the next software update for iOS (8.1.1) which should be able to address the functionality issues of the TLC chips.

iPhone’s 16GB handset smartphones are using MLC NAND chipsets, but apparently, since TLC reduces the overall cost, the higher capacity variants of the iPhone are using TLC chips.

A growing number of people, especially Korean consumers, are reporting performance drops with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models and are requesting for replacement handsets.

The report further stated that overseas IT media sources speculated that Apple could recall the iPhone 6 Plus 128GB handsets for a replacement. However, Apple has not confirmed anything about the same. 

iPhone 6 Bending Solution

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How to Clear Your iPhone Keyboard Dictionary

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If you’ve been typing on your iPhone for a long time, odds are that you’ve made some mistakes in your typing, and the iPhone spell checking software has corrected them. Or, in my case — particularly because I work in the computer industry — the iPhone has “corrected” many of my acronymns the wrong way.

As a simple example, I like to use the acronym “DD” to refer to my devdaily website, but if I’m typing fast and not paying attention, the iPhone software keeps “correcting” that to “DE”. Well, “DE” isn’t right, but the iPhone has corrected this so many times when I wasn’t looking that it keeps defaulting to that behavior.

Since there are many similar acronym problems like this, I finally wondered, is there some way to reset my iPhone typing dictionary?

After digging around for the answer, I finally found it. On your iPhone — and presumably your iPad as well — you can reset your spelling dictionary by following these steps:

  • From the main screen, tap Settings
  • Then tap General
  • Scroll to the bottom of the list and tap Reset
  • Tap Reset Keyboard Dictionary

When you do this the iPhone brings up a window that says

“This will delete all custom words you have typed on the keyboard, returning the keyboard to factory defaults.”

If you’re sure this is what you want, go ahead and continue with the process, but if you’re not, just tap the Cancel button.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4732832

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Samsung Files Counterclaim Against Microsoft Over Patent Licensing Lawsuit

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Back during the summer the newest legal battles involving Samsung started to arise, as Microsoft began the process to take Samsung to court over the issue of not paying royalty fees to the company due to licensing. Samsung proclaimed that they didn’t owe any money for licensing fees over those patents that Microsoft owned which Microsoft felt was not OK. The original filing of the lawsuit appeared in early 2014, as Microsoft was seeking a payment for the nearly $6.9 million in interest on those royalties that Samsung apparently still hadn’t paid, as they had allegedly stopped paying Microsoft for licensing fees since September of last year. The interest was part of a massive $1 Billion collaboration deal between Samsung and Microsoft as part of Samsung’s manufacturing Windows phones, and those court battles are starting to gain momentum as both Samsung and Microsoft have filed counterclaims to each others original filings on the lawsuit.

Today, Reuters reports that Samsung has recently filed a counterclaim basically asking the court for a declaration to terminate the agreement between them and Microsoft over licensing fees and the alleged interest amount that is still owed. Samsung’s argument is that once Microsoft had acquired Nokia’s hardware business and a large number of their patents, they became a direct competitor to Samsung in the hardware sector, something that wasn’t previously the case since Microsoft wasn’t actually manufacturing their own hardware. Because of the Nokia acquisition, Samsung claims that continuing to share sensitive information with Microsoft as part of the original agreement would have created issues with U.S. anti-trust laws and Samsung is weary of any continuity of the agreement for fear of being slapped with collusion charges.

Microsoft has also filed their own counterclaim with an amended complaint of the original suit filing, stating that regardless of their acquiring Nokia’s hardware division, Samsung should now be allowed to “unilaterally kill” the patent-licensing agreement between the two of them. Gaining the ability and rights from the courts decision to stop the agreement if they so chose could gain Samsung more authority in the matter between them and Microsoft and allow for them to renegotiate terms. Microsoft states however that despite Samsung’s arguments, they feel they have a really strong case.